Politics Russian government resignation

Ivan le Fou

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Russian PM Medvedev and his government are resigning en masse, per Reuters, “to give President Vladimir Putin room to carry out changes he wants to make to the constitution.”


Accepting the resignation, Putin thanked the ministers for their hard work and asked them to function as a caretaker government until a new one can be formed. Medvedev and Putin had met for a work meeting to discuss the state-of-the-nation address earlier on Wednesday, the Kremlin said. Medvedev explained that the cabinet is resigning in accordance with Article 117 of the Russian Constitution, which states that the government can offer its resignation to the president, who can either accept or reject it. During his speech, Putin said he intended to create the position of deputy secretary of Russia’s Security Council, which would be offered to Medvedev, whose move to the new role will mean Russia will have a new prime minister when a new government is formed.

Putin also proposed multiple amendments to Russia’s constitution. His proposals would entail “substantial changes” to the constitution as well as to the “entire balance of power, the power of the executive, the power of the legislature, the power of the judiciary,” Medvedev explained. “In this context, it is obvious that, as the government, we must provide the president with a capability to make all decisions,” which are required to implement the proposed plan, Medvedev said announcing the en-masse resignation.
 
What is Mr Putin proposing?
At the end of his speech, Mr Putin put forward several constitutional reforms.

They included giving the lower house of parliament, the State Duma, "greater responsibility" for the appointment of the prime minister and the cabinet.

Currently, the president appoints the prime minister and government ministers, and the Duma approves the decision.

Mr Putin also suggested an increased role for an advisory body called the State Council. The council, which is currently chaired by Mr Putin, comprises the heads of Russia's federal regions. Mr Putin said it had proved to be "highly effective".

Other measures include:

  • Limiting the supremacy of international law
  • Amending the rules that limit presidents to two consecutive terms
  • Strengthening laws that prohibit presidential candidates who have held foreign citizenship or foreign residency permits

 
After watching US politics who can blame him.
China and Russia systems are now not that dissimilar to ..erm that little German corporal.
 
Putin can't be President again, so goes around for another couple of terms as PM, that's how this all pans out right?
 
Putin, Medvedev, Putin, Medvedev. It’s all about keeping power.

Putin is a strongman, has been forever. Ever since the days of the second Chechen war victory and that muppet Kadyrov in Grozny.

Is Russia doing that bad? Not really, alcoholism has been on the decline for years and the govt has been pushing for a boost in Russians birthrate, always a difficult thing to achieve especially considering how low they got in the 90s.
 
Is Russia doing that bad? Not really, alcoholism has been on the decline for years and the govt has been pushing for a boost in Russians birthrate, always a difficult thing to achieve especially considering how low they got in the 90s.

I don´t think so but I read Putin had to put on the table a very unpopular pension reform that sparked unusual protests.
 
I don´t think so but I read Putin had to put on the table a very unpopular pension reform that sparked unusual protests.

I think corruption is more of an issue and lack of accountability on the part of government officials of all levels. Also, there is a widespread dissatisfaction to put it mildly with a wealth distribution in the country. However, this is not a grass roots driven forced resignation. Putin is re-shuffling the deck for personal reasons and implementing Constitutional amendments. The pension issue is that the average life expectancy of a Russian male is lower than a government instituted retirement age. In contrast member of security and military apparatus can retire early, after 20 years of service.
 
Mikhail Mishustin, former head of the Federal Tax Service, is the new Prime Minister.
 
I think corruption is more of an issue and lack of accountability on the part of government officials of all levels.

Actually corruption is not an issue at all for most Russian people today. In the past decade government very successful worked to counter corruption (not in higher level, but where average person may face it). Most of municipal and state services are available through internet (gosuslugi.ru web services are great and widely used), higher wages for police, judges, municipal\government officials, lots of arrests of corrupted officials up to ministers, governors, mayors. I as an average person never faced corruption in any form in last 10-15 years, but can remember until 2000 it was a real problem for everyone.

Pensions on other hand is a bigger issue. I think such reform must drown any politican and only very high public support of Putin allowed government to make reform. Still it was biggest blow to Putin popularity and critical issue.

The pension issue is that the average life expectancy of a Russian male is lower than a government instituted retirement age

Not really true, but close (68 years is a life expectancy for male and 65 is retirement age). Also, pensions in Russia are quite low (~$250 average) and that is even bigger problem.
 
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@AND how is that move from Putin viewed in Russia?

As a sort of power grab? Or a way to actually implement reforms in a comprehensive way?
 
As a sort of power grab? Or a way to actually implement reforms in a comprehensive way?

Difficult question, here is no any common public opinion. Constitutional reform itself is not huge enough to call it power grab, but certainly it is preparations to the ending of last Putin's presidential term.

Resignation of the government was rated positively. Some of the ministers were highly unpopular (minister of health, minister of education, minister of culture and some other) and even Putin supporters waited for some changes. I see this resignation as a separate move not directly connected with constitutional reform.

There is also some other reforms were announced, most important are:
1. Additional pays and privileges for parents - targeted to counter population decline.
2. Measures to counter foreign influences on Russian politics (prohibition of dual citizenship for politics and officials, precedence of the Russian constitution over the international treaty)
 
These political jobs for life never seem to end well particularly when they are constitutionally supported. Eventually things do go pear-shaped and what other out is there for the leader except in the Russian tradition a good old fashioned poisoning.
 
Not really true, but close (68 years is a life expectancy for male and 65 is retirement age). Also, pensions in Russia are quite low (~$250 average) and that is even bigger problem.

68 years???
 
So, it could be seen as something benefic for Russia, within its borders, and not to bolster its influence abroad. Yes?
 

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