Photos T. 34-85 late Winter, early Spring 1945, 1/16 Scale.

Connaught Ranger

Mi Field Marshall
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Living in Transylvania, Romania, its been about 20 years since I built a model kit, but, I got interested in a magazine buy it by a part a week 1:16 model of a T. 34-85, the kit was mainly metal, screw together but, I decided not to start the build until I had all the pieces which took over the best part of two years.

I also decided not to build it by going the step by step magazine way as in Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, etc.. etc.. but broke it down to lower hull, engine compartment, drivers station, then upper hull exterior, ammo storage, then onto wheels (I changed the magazine kit wheels for WW2 era version, despite the magazine implication, their kit was for a post-war version and I omitted the front hull splash board brackets, side fuel pump box as well.)

Decided to do a late Winter - early Spring 1945 period version, not modeled on any particular pictures of actual vehicle, I also decided to try my hand at weathering, and some scratch building.

This is still a work in progress, with some more weathering and side boxes to be finished, and engine hatch interiors to be painted.

The main hull components, turret, gun barrel and wheel bogies(?) swing arms are metal, a lot of the smaller detail add on's such as fuel drums, tracks, wheels, turret hatches, and ammo, ammo drums, mg's are plastic.

Not sure where it was made, but the hull pieces, turret are very close in manufacture to some of the 1/16 RC types out of China.

I think you might call me an old school modeler, as I try to use what's to hand, some of the model paint, putty and glue was in my old model box for well over the last 20 years. As well as scratch building a few bits here and there.

Its not fully fixed together as I wanted to access the inside, so, the turret roof can be removed, and the upper hull can be dismounted, held in place at the rear with two steel nails.

I also wish to thank my brother Anthony for his helpful advice, tips and help.

More pictures will be added as it gets completed.

The kit weighs over 7 Kilo.

Tank C .jpg
Tank B.jpg
Tank A.jpg
Tank 24 .jpg
Tank 23.jpg
Tank 22.jpg
Tank 21 .jpg
Tank 21.jpg
Tank 20.jpg
Tank 19.jpg
Tank 18.jpg
Tank 17.jpg
Tank 16.jpg
Tank 15 .jpg
Tank 15 .jpg
Tank 14 .jpg
Tank 13 .jpg
Tank 12.jpg
Tank 11.jpg
Tank 10.jpg
Tank 9.jpg
Tank 9.jpg
 
Tank 8.jpg
Tank 7.jpg
Tank 6 .jpg
Tank 5.jpg
Tank 4 .jpg
Tank 3 .jpg
Tank 2 .jpg
Tank 1 .jpg


So, still a bit to do with her, considering in the near future getting some metal tracks for a more realistic sag, scratch building the hull tool boxes, and sourcing some extra figures, but. in all I am happy with my attempts after so many years being away from the hobby, as well as trying out the acrylic painting and weathering for the first time.
 
I think you went a little too far with the weathering. I have not build a model kit in the last 15 years but i do enjoy watching others build them :)
Maybe you can borrow some tips from this guy
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Great vid, Droopy and thanks for posting it! I can always use tips! I've built a couple Zvezda models, and fit is always a challenge with them. I usually go with Tamiya.
 
I think you went a little too far with the weathering. I have not build a model kit in the last 15 years but i do enjoy watching others build them :)
Maybe you can borrow some tips from this guy
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Thanks, constructive criticism is welcomed, I did say it was my first build in over 20 years,
also first use of Acrylics, first attempt at weathering so forgive my over the top efforts,
its good to know you can still go to far even at 63 lol!

To my mind, seeing the wear and tear that such machines were exposed too, the harsh winters encountered, the Soviet careless attitude of "if its not broke dont fix it," particularly in the field, and winter months, early spring not being that conducive to cosmetic renderings like new paint and polish I fell such a vehicle might have been encountered here and there, particularly so when many tanks had a life span of circa 20+ weeks.

Also it looks a lot better than the one in the magazine build.
 
Great vid, Droopy and thanks for posting it! I can always use tips! I've built a couple Zvezda models, and fit is always a challenge with them. I usually go with Tamiya.
There are other people that build and paint models and miniatures. But that is my main go-to channel on YT. Also check the links bellow.
Thanks, constructive criticism is welcomed, I did say it was my first build in over 20 years,
also first use of Acrylics, first attempt at weathering so forgive my over the top efforts,
its good to know you can still go to far even at 63 lol!

To my mind, seeing the wear and tear that such machines were exposed too, the harsh winters encountered, the Soviet careless attitude of "if its not broke dont fix it," particularly in the field, and winter months, early spring not being that conducive to cosmetic renderings like new paint and polish I fell such a vehicle might have been encountered here and there, particularly so when many tanks had a life span of circa 20+ weeks.

Also it looks a lot better than the one in the magazine build.
I don't know if i could do a better job myself even if i am younger than you. It was an honest opinion. I didn't do any research about what the soviets did with their armor during the winter. So it might be that vehicles did end up looking like that in the spring.

Also i have a fascination, but not a wallet for Warhammer miniatures. The things these people do with painting this miniatures is awesome. Good tips in this videos too for painting with acrylic paints.
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My most sincere congratulations, first for having obtained all the pieces, second, the painting is more than good, remembering that in combat conditions they had to paint whatever they had on hand, so it would be historically correct; I would only have one suggestion, the figure of the officer and the soldier who accompanies him are very "clean", as if they were reviewing, the tank driver and the officer if they would be more in line with the operation of the vehicle (although she looks very neat and list for inspection); greetings from Colombia, more than surprised by your diploma from the United Nations and much more surprised by what you achieved with that tank on such a large scale.
 
My most sincere congratulations, first for having obtained all the pieces, second, the painting is more than good, remembering that in combat conditions they had to paint whatever they had on hand, so it would be historically correct; I would only have one suggestion, the figure of the officer and the soldier who accompanies him are very "clean", as if they were reviewing, the tank driver and the officer if they would be more in line with the operation of the vehicle (although she looks very neat and list for inspection); greetings from Colombia, more than surprised by your diploma from the United Nations and much more surprised by what you achieved with that tank on such a large scale.
Thank you for your kind words, the officer and soldier have yet to be "broken in" :p
I think I will have them posed with a Wiley's Jeep I am currently working on,
as I mentioned the tank was my first kit in 20 years, I will add more pictures when I get some time.
IMG_1769.JPG
IMG_1770.JPG

I served with No. 6 Platoon, "C" Company, 46th IRISHBATT with UNIFIL, South Lebanon. 1979 - 1980.
IMG_1771.JPG

Another reminder one of my old uniforms from that period.
 

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