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The first misconception I find about TET 68 - and I find it quite amusing - is that we were taken by surprise. Military intelligence is analyzed at two levels, the first level is determining the enemy’s capabilities. Rather than try to guess what he is going to do, you try to determine what he is capable of doing then you defend accordingly. The second level is to determine intent. This is much more difficult and usually requires the personal touch - prisoners, informants, radio intercepts, the truly difficult stuff. When our side started accumulating intel about the plans for TET 68 we actually knew tactical intent before we evaluated capability. An attack on over 30 locations at one time was certainly understood to be the intent...
English Electric Canberra. A legend is born. The Canberra can be classed as one of the greatest aircraft of all times, it was the first jet bomber to enter service with the Royal Air Force, the German Arado Ar 234 “Blitz” being the worlds first. Near the later stages of WW2 the UK Ministry of Aircraft Production was looking for a jet bomber to replace the Hawker Typhoon in the role of fighter-bomber. The first request for the replacement jet bomber was for an aircraft with approximately 40,000lbs “all-up-weight” that would be powered by a single 12,000lb thrust engine mounted in the rear fuselage. By the end of 1945 these specifications had changed to a high-speed two-crew bomber and given the title B3/45. In early 1946 a contract was...
Bang! Bang! Bang! I, still fully asleep, look up, as a bright light overwhelms me as the door to our CHU (Container Housing Unit) flings open. I hear a booming voice, but it is unintelligible as I regain a tangent of cognition. As my eyes adjust to the discomforting immediacy of SSG Donahue’s silhouette, I began to comprehend the words being spoken to me, us. SSG D speaks louder than was necessary in those waking moments, “Company formation at the motor-pool, 20 minutes!” The door was immediately slammed shut by SSG D, partially a reprieve from the early morning light that had invaded our home, and equally a measure to stir an awakening among us. I heard his words, but ever so wanted to pretend that I was not listening. Hearing 20...
From the date of its inception there never has been a more used, abused, tested and tried aircraft as the Huey. The utilitarian aspect of the aircraft made it invaluable, its low cost and ability to take punishment made it famous, but the version that everyone gravitates to was the testosterone model, the gunship. No other aircraft has been saddled with as many ridiculous, stupid, ingenious, absurd, amusing armament configurations as this aircraft. Before I discuss the tough guys, I went to spend a few minutes discussing the weapons that were standard on the “D” model, the M-23 system using the M-60D with the spade handle grips. Generally it was a well designed system, but needed some modification in the field. The ammo chute...
The “Jump Jet” has arrived Classed as the first operational close-support fighter/reconnaissance aircraft with vertical take-off capabilities, the Hawker Siddeley Harrier or sometimes better known as the “Jump Jet” came to the eyes of the world in the 1960s. Design on a vertical take-off aircraft started in the late 1950s with Stanley Hooker, Sir Sydney Camm and Ralph Hooper developed the Hawker Siddeley P.1127. Even at the start of the project, Hawker was without official backing from the then British Ministry of Supply for its prototype aircraft, so work as a private venture. During this period Hawker company had been heavily occupied with submissions for the replacement of the RAF Canberra fleet. Of note was this was later...
As early as TET 1968 we had reports of two non Vietnamese, both black men, working with the VC in the Duc Pho area. Our aircraft spotted them on at least two occasions, on one occasion in March or April one of our crewchiefs had the opportunity to take one of them under fire, but believed the individual to be an American separated from his unit. Not only were we hesitant to report this information, partly because of racial problems in the U.S., but reports we did make were placed immediately above top secret levels of security. The only people in the AO who could access the information were battalion staff officers. After leaving Vietnam I heard nothing more about the individuals until I came accross data concerning the heavy...
If you look on the internet seeking information on suitcase nuclear bombs you might be surprised to find that the US had one as early as the 1960's that wasn’t fazed out until 1988. In fact, we had over 200 of the little beggars. Special Atomic Demolition Munition (SADM) the backpackers nuclear bomb. They make everything else in a back pack version, so why not? The internet will tell you that the MK-54 Mod 1 was a Navy-Marine device and they will show you a short video of a SEAL jumping from a CH-46 at low level after he has supposedly suited up the thing and has it on his back. This information is fine because the Navy and Marines need the press, SF doesn’t want it. SF thrives on misdirection. The MK-54 actually was a...
Army aviation in Vietnam was centered on the Assault Helicopter Company and the lions share of UH-1 assets in country were formed in these type units. The company was assigned 20 UH-1D aircraft in two lift platoons. These were called "slicks" because they had less hanging on the side then the gunships. They were the workhorses, doing combat assaults, resupply, command and control and what ever else anyone could think of. D models were the first aircraft used as slicks, they were longer then previous models and had room on each side of the transmission housing for a doorgunner station. The aircraft had seating for 11 passengers and two pilots, but carrying troops with combat loads, this was unrealistic so the seats were pulled...
The Luftfaust , Fliegerfaust and Fliegerschreck The Luftfaust Man Portable anti aircraft missile systems In 1945 the Luftfaust was designed by ‘Hugo Schneider’ of Leipzig and by the end of that year the German army were ready to field test the weapon system. The early version 'Luftfaus A' had only four shorter barrels however in this article we will be looking at the 'Lufthaus B' Un skilled labour was employed to make the Luftfaus however it is believed approximately 10000 units were made by the end of the war. Information on how many were issued and the use against allied aircraft is not available. The introduction of the ‘Luftfaus’ was an attempt by the Germans to reduce the dominance of Allied air superiority. The Luftfaus was...
On one of the last training exercises I was with while in SF I was part of an OPFOR working against a regular army battalion. The exercise took place in the forests around Cedar City, Utah, down in the southwestern corner. The umpires were clearly on the side of the regular army and would not even give reliable information normally forthcoming in such an exercise. Our team leader got the bright idea of sending someone in to the local town under cover to see if we could pick up some information. Because I was the intel NCO, I was chosen. Actually, I think it was because I could look the scruffiest the quickest. Dressed in old civvies I headed for the nearest road. Shortly, I caught a ride with a ranch hand in an old pickup...
The first Americans to see the Japanese that fatal day they bombed Pearl Harbor were not on the ground. They were in the air, and one of them was a woman. Cornelia Clark Fort was born on February 5, 1919, in Nashville, Tennessee to a wealthy family. Her father was a co-founder of the National Life and Accident Insurance Company, enabling them to live in a mansion on a vast farming estate. Despite his accomplishments, Fort Senior had a terrible fear. One day, he gathered together his three sons and had them swear on the Bible that they would never, ever, fly. Cornelia was only five when it happened, so he did not think to make her take that vow. What girl would want to fly? Socially isolated because of her family’s wealth and power...
The Treatment of Prisoners of War A brief Introduction “Today the prisoner of war is a spoilt darling.... He is better treated than the modern criminal....The wonder is that any soldiers fight at all” James Maloney Spaight, 1911 The Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 were among the first formal statement of the laws of war and war crimes. POWs captured by Germany and the Allies were treated relatively well during the first world war, with one POW - Lawrence Hartle stating during an interview that the worst aspect was the lack of food. He added that this was not mistreatment, but due to the German’s having no food to offer. A British officer interrogating an Austrian officer Within the first 6 months of the war, more...
This map shows an area west of Quang Ngai that was always a hotspot, nicknamed the Horseshoe. Charley wanted to control the area because if he could call it home, it was the last haven before they were under the artillery fans on the way to Quang Ngai, Mo Duc and points east. This is a picture of the Horseshoe area. The high terrain always presented a problem. One fine day a Dolphin aircraft from the 174th AHC was flying C in C for the 3/1 Inf Bn when they spotted a carrying party leaving the area headed for Hill 411. Dropping down to investigate, the entire village erupted in gunfire crippling the aircraft. The pilot did a textbook 180 rotation onto the sandbar in the middle of the river where they started taking ground...
This is going to be the first of several (4 maybe 5) posts on this topic. I plan on presenting my experience first, then deal with different aspects of the campaign. I have done much research on the subject and hope you will find it interesting. The first misconception I find about TET 68 - and I find it quite amusing - is that we were taken by surprise. Military intelligence is analyzed at two levels (SF MI school wasn't a total waste) the first level is determining the enemys capabilities. Rather then try to guess what he is going to do, you try to determine what he is capable of doing then you defend accordingly. The second level is to determine intent. This is much more difficult and usually requires the personal touch -...
....it makes an ass out of U and ME they say. I nearly learned that the hard way when i was shooting in the Marine Corps match in Camp Le June NC, in 1995. The matches were over and we still had one last day before we flew back, so we went down to the 200m Zero range for a fun shoot. There were about 40 of us, some Brits and some US Marines. We had an array of weapons layed out on the firing line, mainly SA80's, M16 and a few sniper rilfles from both sides of the pond. Being that most of the ammo was 5.56 we had magazines stacked up and it all had to go, lets face it..no one wants to unload and rebox that lot ! Anyway given that there was still lots of ammo to get through and there were lots of weapons lying about I thought I'd...

Media comments

  • BTR-152 APC
    @haze99
    It is South Africa, See attached PDF (stored on our server so safe)

    Document is titled
    SOME REMININISCENSES ON THE OPERATIONS CONDUCTED BY COMBAT TEAM 3 BATTLE GROUP 10 (61 MECHANISED BATTALION) DURING OPERATION PROTEA BY (THEN) MAJOR JOE WEYERS COMMANDER COMBAT TEAM 30 (C...
  • BTR-152 APC
    With a SGMT mounted, now would is this photo by from Mozambique or Chad?
  • 1817630002-1
    Notice the belly turret is a solid unmanned unit, controlled remotely through optical system.
  • 2743871480550.jpg
    Not even being drilled and yet tall three are in step together lol.
  • William Thomas LIVERSAGE
    I sometimes look up these addresses, and with houses in the UK typically not being torn down a lot are still there. Seeing where someone lived to me adds a personal touch to their stories...

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